Recent Storm Damage Posts

What is an Ice Dam?

9/30/2020 (Permalink)

Ice Dam

Correct ventilation in an attic is key to avoiding ice dams in your home. Without proper ventilation in the attic, heat will rise through the roof peak, making the center of the roof warmer than the edges. After a snowstorm, this uneven spread in temperature causes the snow to melt at different rates. Ice then builds near the edges and blocks snow-melt from draining through the gutter system. This process is called ice damming. As the snow melts, water can dislodge the shingles and roof flashing and even pry apart gutter seams. Because water expands when it freezes, the cycle of freezing and thawing can magnify this damage. If ice dams form on your gutters, water can eventually permeate the roof and cause wood-rot, mold, and drywall damage in your attic. For restoration services please call SERVPRO of Carroll County 410-857-5332

Flood Zone

9/21/2020 (Permalink)

flood zone

Floods rank as one of the most common and widespread natural disasters in the United States. Whether you live near the coastline, along city streets or near a river or lake, there is always a potential for suffering flood damage. On average, floods cost $6 billion in annual losses in the U.S. Flooding can also result from plumbing failures, frozen pipes and damaged structures. Flood damage can affect your business operation in a variety of ways and can range in size from being isolated to a single room to entire floors being fully submerged.

Knowing how to prepare and deal with potential flooding in advance can affect how much of your property can be restored and how much has to be replaced. Below are prevention, mitigation and restoration tips to follow until help arrives:

Flood Prevention Tips:

  • Determine if your property is in a floodplain.
  • In any emergency, always listen to the instructions given by local emergency management officials.
  • Carefully assess how your company functions, both internally and externally, to determine which staff, materials, procedures and equipment are absolutely necessary to keep the business operating.
  • Plan what you will do if your building, plant or store is not accessible. This type of planning is often referred to as a continuity of operations plan, or COOP, and includes all facets of your business.
  • Plan for payroll continuity.
  • Review your emergency plans annually. Just as your business changes over time, so do your preparedness needs. When you hire new employees or when there are changes in how your company functions, you should update your plans and inform your people.

After storm safety check list

8/28/2020 (Permalink)

Hurricane season

  • Make contact with family and friends in the affected area and let those that you know outside of the affected area that you are safe.
  • Return home only when authorities indicate it is safe. Attempting to re-enter the area can be dangerous and it is important to wait until the area has been cleared as safe by officials.
  • Avoid areas with debris and downed power lines.
  • Avoid flood waters, whether on foot or in vehicle. Just 6 inches of moving water can knock a person down, and one foot of fast-moving water can sweep your vehicle away.
  • Take note of any damage to your belongings or to your property
  • Photograph any damage to your belongings/property for insurance purposes
  • Tarp or board up damaged roofs and windows to prevent further damage. Your insurance may not cover additional damage that occurs after the storm has passed.

Lightning

8/26/2020 (Permalink)

lightning strike

What You Need to Know, NO PLACE outside is safe when thunderstorms are in the area. If you hear thunder, lightning is close enough to strike you. When you hear thunder, immediately move to safe shelter: a substantial building with electricity or plumbing or an enclosed, metal-topped vehicle with windows up. Stay in safe shelter at least 30 minutes after you hear the last sound of thunder.

Stay off corded phones, computers and other electrical equipment that put you in direct contact with electricity. Avoid plumbing, including sinks, baths and faucets. Stay away from windows and doors, and stay off porches. Do not lie on concrete floors, and do not lean against concrete walls.

SERVPRO of Carroll County is here to help if you experience damage to your home or business from lightening. Lightening is very powerful and can cause odor, damaged structure, or even a fire. We are here to help you clean it up.  410-857-5332

Don't drown, turn around!

8/13/2020 (Permalink)

Flooded car

Most of the flood related deaths occur in cars, because the driver didn’t realize the depth of the floodwater. However, even a little bit of standing water on a road can cause a big-time problem. Here's what can happen at specific water depths:

• 6 inches: Water up to 6 inches deep can cause your tires to lose traction with the road. When this happens, your vehicle can skid. While you probably won't drown in this situation, losing control of the vehicle may cause you to crash.
• 12 inches: A foot of water can cause small and midsize vehicles to float. If the water is moving fast, your car can be carried away by the current—with you still inside.
• 24 inches: Even large pickups and SUVs can be swept away by 2 feet of water on a flooded street. Worse yet, as the vehicle is carried along, it may tip over, trapping you inside with the floodwater still rising.

Your emergency check list

8/13/2020 (Permalink)

  • Water (one gallon per person per day)
  • Food (non-perishable 3-day supply)
  • Dust masks or bandanas
  • Battery operated radio, preferably a NOAA Weather Radio
  • Flashlight and extra batteries
  • Fire extinguisher
  • Whistle to signal for help
  • Clothing
  • Manual can opener
  • Plastic sheeting, garbage bags and duct tape
  • Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities
  • Hygiene items
  • Important documents; copies of insurance policies, identification and bank account information
  • Cash
  • first aid kit
  • Matches in a waterproof container

SERVPRO of Carroll County is locally owned and operated, so we’re a part of this community too. We are also part of a national network of over 1,700 Franchises, which enables us to respond quicker with more resources. For major storms and disasters, we can call upon special Disaster Recovery Teams strategically located throughout the country.

Lightning

7/1/2019 (Permalink)

Chimney hit by lightning

SERVPRO of Carroll County is here to help if you experience damage to your home or business from lightening. Lightening is very powerful and can cause odor, damaged structure, or even a fire. We are here to help you clean it up.  410-857-5332

Lightning

What You Need to Know, NO PLACE outside is safe when thunderstorms are in the area!! If you hear thunder, lightning is close enough to strike you. When you hear thunder, immediately move to safe shelter: a substantial building with electricity or plumbing or an enclosed, metal-topped vehicle with windows up. Stay in safe shelter at least 30 minutes after you hear the last sound of thunder.

Stay off corded phones, computers and other electrical equipment that put you in direct contact with electricity. Avoid plumbing, including sinks, baths and faucets. Stay away from windows and doors, and stay off porches. Do not lie on concrete floors, and do not lean against concrete walls.

Preparing your Pets for Emergencies

5/10/2019 (Permalink)

Jake the dog

Remember, during a disaster what’s good for you is good for your pet, so get them ready today. If you leave your pets behind, they may be lost, injured or worse. Never leave a pet chained outdoors. Plan options include: Create a buddy system in case you’re not home. Ask a trusted neighbor to check on your animals. Identify shelters. For public health reasons, many emergency shelters cannot accept pets. Find pet friendly hotels along your evacuation route and keep a list in your pet’s emergency kit. Locate boarding facilities or animal hospitals near your evacuation shelter. Consider an out-of-town friend or relative. Locate a veterinarian or animal hospital in the area where you may be seeking temporary shelter in case your pet needs medical care. Add the contact information to your emergency kit. Have your pet micro chipped and make sure that you not only keep your address and phone number up-to-date, but that you also include contact info for an emergency contact outside of your immediate area. Call your local emergency management office, animal shelter or animal control office to get advice and information. If you are unable to return to your home right away, you may need to board your pet. Find out where pet boarding facilities are located. Most boarding kennels, veterinarians and animal shelters will need your pet's medical records to make sure all vaccinations are current. If you have no alternative but to leave your pet at home, there are some precautions you must take, but remember that leaving your pet at home alone can place your animal in great danger!

Prepare Your Home for an Emergency

5/10/2019 (Permalink)

Planning for any emergency requires considering all likely scenarios that could result when things that you rely on daily- such as electricity, water, heat, air conditioning, telephone services and transportation- are disrupted or lost for a considerable amount of time. Consequently, you should plan on having food, water, and other essential goods to get you through the emergency. Most emergency management planner suggests having enough supplies to last you and your family for three to five days for weather -related events. However, many things may affect you decision, including storage space, special needs, number of people I the household and available resources.

The basic items that should be stored in your home include water, food, first aid supplies, clothing and bedding, tools, emergency supplies, and specialty items. Keep the items that you would most likely need at home in one easy-to-carry container such as a plastic storage bin, backpack, or duffel bag. Store it in a convenient place and put a smaller version in your car. Remember to change the stored water and rotate the food supplies every six months (place dates on the containers). Check the supplies and re-evaluate your needs every year. Consult your physician or pharmacist about storing medications, and maintain a current list of your family’s prescription needs.

Tornado Safety

5/10/2019 (Permalink)

Tornado Safety - what YOU Can Do!

Before the Storm:

  • Develop a plan for you and your family for home, work, school, and when outdoors.
  • Have frequent drills
  • Know the county in which you live, and keep a highway map nearby to follow storm movements from weather bulletins.
  • Have a NOAA All Hazards Weather Radio with a warning alarm tone and batter back-up to receive warnings.
  • Listen to radio and television for information
  • If planning a trip outdoors, listen to the latest forecasts and take necessary action if threatening weather is possible.

If a Tornado Warning is issued or if threatening weather approaches

  • In a home or building, move to a pre-designated shelter, such as a basement.
  • If an underground shelter is not available, more to an interior room or hallway on the lowest floor and get under a sturdy piece of furniture.
  • Stay away from windows
  • Do not try to out run a tornado in your car: get out of your car immediately and seek nearby safe shelter in a sturdy building.
  • Mobile homes, even if tied down, offer little protection from tornadoes and should be abandoned.
  • If in open country and no shelter is available, lie flat and face down on low ground protecting the back of your head with your arms. Get as far away as possible from trees and cars, as they can be blown onto you.

Storm Damage

2/28/2019 (Permalink)

storm damage

FLOOD TIPS AND ACTION STEPS

AFTER A FLOOD

SAFETY FIRST (For businesses and home owners)

  •  Account that all employees or family members are safe by establishing evacuation plans in advance, identifying areas outside the building that are designated meeting places. Assign select individuals to keep a list of their assigned team’s names and contact numbers in order to account for their whereabouts.
  • If water enters the building and evacuation becomes impossible, move to an upper floor, and wait for rescuers.
  •  While evacuating, avoid attempting to drive through floods or rising water, nearly half of all flash flood fatalities are auto-related.
  •  Do not touch electrical equipment if you are wet or standing in water.
  •  Do not walk through moving water. Even six inches of moving water can make you fall.
  •  Use no open flames (there may be gas escaping from ruptured mains).
  •  Avoid floodwaters. Water may be contaminated by oil, gasoline or raw sewage. Water may also be electrically charged. If the water has entered the structure through the flooding of a creek, stream or river, or if it has filtered through insulation during its intrusion, it is considered to be black water and could be hazardous to your health. Avoid contact with contaminated items as much as possible.
  •  Stay out of any building if it is surrounded by floodwaters.
  •  Listen for news reports to learn if the community’s water supply is safe to drink.
  •  Return only when authorities indicate it is safe.

SECURE THE PROPERTY

  • Contact local emergency officials.
  • Secure main entrances to building.
  •  Alert Security company and Alarm company of the situation.

STABILIZE THE PROPERTY

  • Open basement or low-level windows to equalize water pressure on the building’s foundation and walls.
  • Begin water damage mitigation steps only if local emergency officials deem the structure safe to enter.
  •  Notify your insurance agent or Risk Manager to determine insurance policy guidelines and steps to take.