Recent Water Damage Posts

Water Heater Maintenance

4/30/2019 (Permalink)

Water Damage Water Heater Maintenance Water Heater

Water heaters work hard for you, providing warm baths, clean clothes, and sparkling pots and pans. So show your water heater some love by following a routine maintenance schedule that will keep it running for its 15-year expected lifetime, and perhaps beyond.

Adjust the thermostat to 120 degrees. You’ll save up to 5% in energy costs for every 10 degrees you lower the temperature, plus you’ll reduce the risk of scalding.

Always maintain 2 feet of clearance around the appliance unless the manual specifically states otherwise.

Drain about a quarter of the tank a few times a year to remove sediment and debris. Turn off the cold water supply, hook up a garden hose to the drain valve, then run into a bucket until the water is clear. If the water remains cloudy, briefly open the water supply valve to stir up remaining sediment, and drain the tank again. This also makes the unit operate more quietly.

Carpet delamination

2/25/2019 (Permalink)

Water Damage Carpet delamination delaminated carpet

Carpets consist of four distinct layers. The face yarn is the topmost, and it’s stitched to the next layer, known as primary carpet backing. Made with a pre-developed piece of fabric, it provides support and enhances the integrity of the carpet. Manufacturers then apply a bonding layer that affixes the primary backing to the final section, known as secondary backing. This piece improves the installation process by improving the carpet’s stability.

 The backing layers may separate when the bonding layer fails. Sometimes it’s due to poor installation, but in other cases it can happen when the carpet is damaged by water. A flood, for example, can leave the carpet soaked for days. That’s just enough time to weaken the bonding agent and cause the backing layers to separate. Even overexposure to moisture during carpet cleaning or due to harsh products can cause the problem. Heavy traffic may also eventually lead to adhesive separation between the carpet padding layers.

Water class and category

2/1/2019 (Permalink)

Water Damage Water class and category water damage

There are 3 Basic Categories of Water

Category 1 originates from a sanitary source and poses no substantial risk from dermal, ingestion, or inhalation exposure. However, it may not always remain clean after it comes into contact with other surfaces or materials.

Category 2 contains significant contamination and has the potential to cause discomfort or sickness if contacted or consumed by humans. It may contain potentially unsafe levels of microorganisms or nutrients for microorganisms, as well as other organic or inorganic matter (chemical or biological).

Category 3 is grossly contaminated and may contain pathogenic, toxigenic or other harmful agents. Such water sources may carry silt, organic matter, pesticides, heavy metals, regulated materials, or toxic organic substances.

The 4 Primary Classifications of Water Damage

Class 1 is the least amount of water, absorption and evaporation.  It affects only part of a room or area, or larger areas containing materials that have absorbed minimal moisture.  Little or no wet carpet and/or cushion is present.

Class 2 involves a large amount of water, absorption and evaporation.  It affects at least an entire room of carpet and cushion (pad).  Water has wicked up walls less than 24 inches.  There is moisture remaining in structural materials and substructure soil.

Class 3 involves the greatest amount of water, absorption and evaporation.  Water may have come from overhead.  Ceilings, walls, insulation, carpet, cushion and subfloor in virtually all of the entire area are saturated.

Class 4 relates to specialty drying situations.  Wet materials with very low permeance/porosity (eg. hardwood, plaster, brick, concrete, light-weight concrete and stone).  Typically, there are deep pockets of saturation, which require very low specific humidity.  These types of losses may require longer drying times and special methods.

water alarms

12/5/2018 (Permalink)

Water alarms can be very helpful and can save you money! Water alarms are made to detect water leaks, overflowing or broken sump pumps, or an overflowing toiler. That could come in really handy, especially if you’ve spent a small fortune finishing your basement. Even if you haven’t, a water alarm can help you avoid some costly issues, which can include anything from property damage to mold and mildew.

Ideal Locations to Install Water Alarms:

HVAC unit - There are condensation pumps, usually located at the foot of the unit, these pumps clog easily and often leak unnoticed  

Near a Washing Machine – A busted hose can do incredible amounts of damage in short amount of time.

Bathrooms & Kitchens – It could be a leaky pipe or someone simply forgetting to turn off a faucet. Either way, you’re prepared.

            Other locations include under cabinets, in basement corners or near your water heater. Think about your home and all of the places where a water alarm can stand guard against water damage. When choosing your water alarm, you will have several options from a simply battery-powered alarm. These simple alarms can be found at Home Depot or Lowes for under $15.00.